Wild Care raises $7,630 at annual yard sale

Posted Jul 26, 2017 at 5:13 PM

Wild Care Inc., a wildlife rehabilitation center in Eastham, raised $7,630 at its 23rd annual yard sale on June 10 at the Harwich Community Center, according to a statement from the nonprofit. The proceeds will help finance the care of more than 1,300 native wild animals that have been injured, orphaned or are ill.

The first 200 attendees received a tote bags donated by J.McLaughlin Clothing Store in Chatham. The event was coordinated by Jan Raffaele with help of dozens of volunteers and with the support of Carolyn Carey, executive director of the Harwich Community Center, the statement says. Donors provided thousands of items to sell at the event.

Wild Care’s wildlife rehabilitators treat birds, mammals and reptiles brought to the center with the goal of releasing them back into the wild. Since its founding, the organization has accepted more than 25,000 wild creatures from more than 275 species. Anyone encountering injured, orphaned or ill wildlife can call the Wild Care helpline at 508-240-2255.

Read the article published by Cape Cod Times.

If you find an animal in
distress, please call us at:

508-240-2255

Our helpline and our facility
are open EVERY DAY from
9:00 am – 5:00 pm.
We are located at the
Orleans rotary (on the Eastham side).

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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DID YOU KNOW??

Wild Care has a state-of-the-art seabird therapy pool, which allows seabirds and waterfowl to exercise on running water. This will help our bird friends recover more quickly so they can get back to their watery habitats!